USC leaves first tourney disappointed

first_imgThe USC men’s golf team tied for eighth amid a strong field at its inaugural tournament of the season, the Olympia Fields Invitational in Chicago. The Trojans shot 43-over 883 (295-290-298) for the weekend.USC coach Chris Zambri wasn’t thrilled with the result but saw things the team could build on.Dropoff · Junior Matthew Giles led USC overall, but fell to 10th on the leaderboard on Sunday. – Photo courtesy of USC Sports Information“I’m disappointed and I know every one of them was too,” Zambri said. “I’m disappointed in our finish, but I saw a lot of good things out there from guys.”Seven of the top 10 teams in the country took part in the event, including Stanford and tournament victor Arizona State. The No. 5 Sun Devils seized the lead after the second round and held on for the victory, shooting 30-over 870. Stanford finished fourth, six shots behind the pace.USC was in fifth place at 25-over through the first two rounds but struggled down the stretch, shooting 18-over on Sunday. The Trojans were tied for ninth after the first round of action.Zambri said he thought the team was a little off throughout the weekend despite playing well at times.“There’s a huge difference between seeing some good signs and putting up a good round,” he said.Still, Zambri doesn’t think his team is far from putting up good rounds and being a consistent threat to win tournaments.“I don’t think there are many teams out there that if we play really well we can’t go out and win the tournament,” he said. “We just need to improve enough so that we don’t have to play perfectly to win. We want to be able to play just okay to win.”Junior Matthew Giles paced USC with a 6-over 216 (74-67-75). He shot toward the top of the leaderboard Saturday after posting a 3-under 67 but faltered late and finished 10th. Giles entered the final day of play in fifth place.His second round 67 was the best individual round of the tournament.“His game looks pretty good,” Zambri said. “He was real rusty from having a wrist injury, so he needs to just knock off the rust and chip and putt a little better.”Zambri was also pleased with how his trio of freshmen performed in their college debuts. Martin Trainer tied for 19th at 10-over 220 (73-72-75). T.J. Vogel tied for 33rd at 13-over 223 (74-74-75) and Sam Smith tied for 45th at 17-over 227 (74-77-76).“I was happy to see Martin Trainer play OK in his first college tournament,” Zambri said. “I was happy to see Sam Smith play a good nine every day … T.J. Vogel played OK. His score counted for us every day.”Sophomore Steve Lim rounded out the USC group. He tied for 52nd at 19-over 229 (77-79-73).Most of the team struggled in the final round, although Zambri attributed that more to coincidence than nerves or fatigue.“One of your rounds has to be your worst,” he said. “It was a tough golf course and we really didn’t play as well as I know we can.”Giles, Trainer and Vogel all had their worst round of the weekend on Sunday. Only Lim posted his best score of the tournament on the final day.Zambri and assistant coach Josh Brewer sat down with each player after the tournament and told them where they needed to improve.“Some of them it was more physical and some of them it was a little more mental,” he said. “If they improve, they’re really talented and we have a chance to be one of the better teams.”The Trojans will get their first chance to prove him right this weekend at The Fall Preview in Bremerton, Wash.last_img read more

Pirates’ Heritage Weekend celebrates Legacy of Hope

first_img PHYLLIS COMER—State commissioner, Pennsylvania Department of Education KEITH KEY—President, KBK enterprises MICHAEL MORRIS—Executive director, Camp Enrichment LARRY W. JONES—Inspector with Columbia Gas LA’TASHA D. MAYES—Executive director, New Voices Pittsburgh YINKA AGANGA-WILLIAMS—Executive director, Ajpo (Photos by J.L. Martello)The Pittsburgh Pirates’ Heritage Weekend Celebration, held at PNC Park last week, was a great celebration indeed.The event kicked off with Zumba on Federal. The Pirates brought in the Latin Rhythmz and Oxford Athletic Club that led a dance class outside of PNC Park; from what I witnessed “Dancing With The Stars,” eat your heart out.  Last Friday also featured the Community Champions Awards.  During the pre-game ceremony that took place on the field at PNC Park, 2014 Community Champion Awards were presented to several individuals making significant strides in their profession to better the community. The   award recipients were Yinka Aganga-Williams, Phyllis Comer, Larry Jones, Keith Key, La’Tasha Mayes and Michael Morris. The awards were presented by Pirates President Frank Coonelly.Chaz Kellem, manager of Diversity Initiatives for the Pirates said, “Overall the heritage weekend celebration was a success, as far as showcasing and highlighting the African-American community was concerned with a special emphasis being put on the Negro Leagues.”I asked Kellem about Zumba on Federal and the Faith Night events that were not really meant to be a part of the Heritage Weekend Celebration. He explained that “even though there were other cultures profiled, the African-American culture will always be something that we will recognize and celebrate. Zumba Night and Faith Night were created to cultivate a more welcoming atmosphere for our fans. We understand that these activities are also important to our organization.”I was really impressed by Faith Night. It was a celebration of family community values and faith. It reminded me of a spiritual version of “we are family.”After the game the inspirational speakers were but not limited to; reigning NL MVP Pirates centerfielder Andrew McCutchen, Pirates skipper Clint Hurdle, NL All-Star third baseman Pedro Alvarez, and Pittsburgh’s own Pirates second baseman Neil Walker.As far as the future of the event is concerned, I asked Kellem if he might consider a multi-cultural heritage weekend?“That is definitely something to consider because I personally believe that we can all learn about various cultures together and from each other.”The 2014 Heritage Weekend Celebration was successful once again and judging by the people who were dancing in the streets around PNC Park, the affair set a perfect example leading up to Independence Day and what our country really stands for. Follow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourierLike us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlDownload our mobile app at http://www.appshopper.com/news/new-pittsburgh-courierlast_img read more

Olympia Gives Thanks Donors for $3,000 Raised for Typhoon Haiyan Relief

first_imgSubmitted by Dr. Diana Yu (Twitter: Yu4Health)Samba OlyWa was one of the groups to perform during Olympia Cares, a fundraiser for Typhoon Haiyan devastation.On the bone chilling evening of December 7, about a hundred generous Olympians braved the weather to attend the Olympia Gives- Philippine Disaster Relief Benefit Dance at the Eagle’s Ballroom.  And what a treat they had in store for them!Local groups including Samba OlyWa, Filipino American Society of South Puget Sound dancers, and hula dancer, Reiko Callner,  performed special numbers.  They beat their drums, did their samba, stepped between bamboo poles and did the hula and then invited the audience to participate..  This was a great crowd, willing to put their toes between clacking bamboo poles!!  No one was hurt, of course.The rest of the evening was a gigantic Zumba party with ladies and gents in traditional Filipino garb, Samba attire and street clothes swinging and moving to the beat of Zumba music.  The dancer of the night was a little boy, barely two, who loved the beat of the music and joyfully roamed around on his happy feet.Members of the Filipino American Society of South Puget Sound step between bamboo poles.This event would not have been successful without the generosity of our local businesses and individuals who donated raffle items, including Traditions Café, Cebu’s Restaurant, El Pulgarcito # 2, Allenaid Salon, Soul Journey Connection, Middle Fork Roasters, South Sound YMCA, Yelm Boot Camp, Zonta Club, Daphne Niemann and George Alvarado.  A special thank you to Eagle’s FOE #21 for the venue, Stormans, Inc. and Olympia Food Co-op for evening snacks.Olympia is such an awesome community.  Olympia gives.  Olympia cares and it shows.  With the donations, over $3,000 will be sent to assist in the recovery efforts from Typhoon Haiyan devastation.  Thank you Olympia and Thurston County residents.  You Rock!!Maraming salamat.Photo credits: Wren Barstow and Laura Killian Facebook20Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

State medical scheme makes strides

first_img26 October 2009Since its launch in January 2006, South Africa’s Government Employees Medical Scheme (Gems) has grown its membership base to more than 400 000 principal members, and now provides healthcare cover to over a million beneficiaries.Speaking in Durban this week, Public Service and Administration Minister Richard Baloyi pointed out that over 50% of Gems members were previously unable to access their employer subsidies for medical schemes.“This means that in excess of 500 000 of these individuals did not previously enjoy medical scheme cover, and that they now do,” he told delegates at the 2009 Gems Symposium.“What makes these facts and figures so remarkable is that the impressive growth to date was achieved in a recessionary climate.”Ensuring a healthy workforceBaloyi said Gems had managed a myriad of healthcare challenges effectively, and ensured a healthy workforce that could participate productively in South Africa’s economy.“In so doing, the many successes and considerable growth of Gems is having a powerful knock-on effect in the South African public service and on the overall economy of our country.“Gems’ success as a medical scheme serve as positive proof that the government as an employer can indeed make an indelible mark,” Baloyi said.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Sometimes you get the extra base, sometimes you get picked off stealing in the marketing game

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The market focused on Argentina’s extremely dry conditions during the week, which if it continues, could be the driest summer in the last 40 years. Consequently, the bean market saw a nice rally.Wheat conditions are also dry in the southern plains, which is pushing prices up. However, many say wheat has “nine lives” or that “wheat is a weed” meaning that it is hard to kill. Still, there is going to be some damage, but the extent is unknown. Even so, there is significant supply in storage, so there is still some uncertainty on the wheat market direction.The increases in both beans and wheat pulled up corn prices to levels unseen since last summer. Summer weather uncertainty is also contributing to the rally as speculators bet on potential weather problems.The last few weeks feel like grains have turned a corner and will continue a trend higher. However, it’s important to be cautious for several reasons. One, it’s important to not forget the heavy supply still in storage. This could be somewhat offset if exports are able to increase, considering U.S. corn is the lowest price globally there is good reason to think this is possible. Two, U.S. trade policy and potential change to the RFS (renewable fuel standard) are topics of discussion in Washington right now, and the only thing harder than weather to predict is the government.In late January and early February I sold all of my anticipated 2018 bean crop against August futures. I selected Aug instead of Nov because it was 5 cents higher. At the time, the U.S. bean supply was at a 10-year carryout high and Brazil’s harvest was expected to be very large, maybe even a record. As long as Argentina’s harvest was even slightly below average or better, the market would likely go lower. This would have likely forced the spread between Aug futures and Nov futures to revert from an inverse to a carry.Unfortunately, three weeks later the market dynamics have changed. Every potential weather system that moved through Argentina failed to produce any significant rainfall. This has threatened their bean crop and will likely reduce their overall production significantly. While Brazil’s large crop will cover some of Argentina’s deficiency, it probably won’t replace all of it. This means the world may have to come back to the U.S. for beans and the US carryout could see a large reduction which would drive up the price for old crop beans. There is a chance that U.S. farmers will plant more beans next year, which could put downward pressure on new crop beans, but that is far from certain today.Regardless, knowing what I know now, there is a high probability that Aug futures will be higher than Nov at the end of summer. In the past when Argentina has faced similar severe drought conditions, prices have inverted to as much as $1 per bushel or even a $1.75 per bushel inverse. In an inverse market I have to take the spread loss against the price I have previous sold. I’m not willing to accept that much potential loss on my beans sales. Therefore, on 3/1/18 I bought back my Aug futures and sold Nov futures for a 33-cent loss off my original average sale price of $10.10. This doesn’t change the fact that I’ve sold my beans, it just means my new average bean prices is $9.77 against Nov futures instead of $10.10 against the Aug futures. Did you not anticipate that this could happen?I did. When I placed this trade I knew the possible risks and was willing to accept about a 40 cent loss if the unlikely event of a severe drought in Argentina occurred. All it would have taken was one major rain storm in Argentina during the previous three week period for this trade to likely have worked as originally anticipated. While I try to align my marketing strategy to be the most profitable when the most likely scenario will occur (i.e. average weather and trend line yields), outlier events like this sometimes happens. When they do, it’s important to stay flexible and react quickly to minimize negative outcomes, which I think I did. Why not just buy the Aug futures back and wait to sell the Nov futures at potentially higher prices?If I did that, it would open up my downside risk to unlimited levels. Essentially I would have to take the loss AND have zero downside protection. One of the cornerstones of my marketing strategy is to minimize risk to my farm operation, so this wasn’t a good option for me. I had placed a limit on the risk I would tolerate with this spread trade and I must recognize that the market is in a much different place that it was just three weeks ago. Why not wait a little longer and hope the spread narrows?While I’m extremely disappointed the spread moved against me on this trade, stubbornly sticking with a trade without considering market risk adjustments is a good way to lose even more money. When market dynamics change, the prudent thing to do is accept the early loss, reduce one’s risk, and look for new opportunities. So, what is the bean spread market landscape now?Historically, when Argentina has major drought the old crop/new crop bean spread in March continues to worsen/invert until the U.S. harvest. Therefore, I’d rather take my loss now and stay profitable on beans than worry and hope the market spread would turn around down the road. Do you regret the trade?Hindsight is always 20/20. Like all farmers when a trade doesn’t work out it’s common to have feelings of regret and frustration. But, this is going to happen from time to time, so it’s best to learn from it and move forward.In reviewing the trade again, my rationale for the trade at the time was reasonable. It was most profitable if average weather and trend line yields happened. A severe drought seemed unlikely at the time. Even now, new crop beans are only 30 cents higher than where I originally made my sales. Would this trade be considered speculating?While I generally try to minimize speculating in my grain marketing strategy, trying to capitalize on the spread to add additional profits to my original sale would be considered speculating. Still I knew the risks when I placed the trade and I didn’t leave the final outcome open-ended. Instead I allowed myself around a 40-cent loss on the trade, before getting out. I ended up with only a 28-cent net loss. The reason its only 28 cents is because I originally sold Aug bean futures (an old crop contract) for a 5-cent premium to the Nov futures before the 33-cent spread loss to roll the position forward to the Nov futures (a new crop contract).In baseball terms, I would say the trade was a single, with an attempt to steal second base. Unfortunately, I got picked off stealing. While disappointing, there is a lot of game left to play. In grain marketing it isn’t realistic to win on every trade. That’s why I try to be transparent with my marketing strategies. It would be easier to only detail out the times the trades went as expected or were profitable. I believe there can be a lot to be learned on the unsuccessful trades too. In this example, laying out the maximum loss I was willing to accept, staying flexible, and getting out when it’s clear the trade isn’t working was the best way to handle the unfortunate situation. And now moving forward, it’s important to not let the disappointment from this trade keep me fearful of considering new trades that might have a lot of potential. When a farmer is so scared they will make a mistake that they do nothing, it can be just as damaging to a market strategy as a farmer who takes on too much risk. Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

Shop Talk with Fennig Equipment – Planter Edition

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It’s time for the first edition of Shop Talk with Fennig Equipment. In this video, Adam Fennig goes over some areas to consider looking at while there’s time in the shop this winter. In addition to maintenance suggestions, Adam goes over closing wheel selections and recommendations. All that and more in this video.last_img

Move Over, Fast Food – Here Comes Accelerator Food

first_imgChina and America want the AI Prize Title: Who … How OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culture How to Get Started in China and Have Success What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… With thousands of gastropreneurs launching local food businesses around the U.S. – cupcake trucks and boutique farms, gourmet this and sous vide that – “food accelerators” are setting up to put them through tech-style incubator programs and turn their early-stage ideas into fully baked businesses.It’s one part Y Combinator, one part “Hell’s Kitchen.”Learning From Tech Startup Best Practices“Food companies can really learn from the tech world,” says Krysia Zajonc, CEO of Local Food Lab in Palo Alto, where the inaugural fall class of 12 startups included Brunched in the Face (an all-day brunch truck) and LifeBites, which makes energy snacks made from a traditional South African recipe. “In the food world there’s this idea that if you have your grandma’s recipe, you can put it out there and just because you love it the whole world will love it. But imagine saying, ‘I created an app that my grandma loves, so everyone else will love it too.’”You may or may not love those South African snacks (peanut-corn butter?) but LifeBites must be onto something, because Local Food Lab accepts only startups that have strong business potential (and that fork over the $2,500 enrollment fee). It then puts them through a six-week program to instill the basic best practices of tech startups, like product iteration and testing, data collection, capital efficiency and community engagement.Local Food Lab CEO Zajonc went to Stanford and Columbia Business School. She’s worked with farmers, producers and buyers of organic food – plus she’s worked at Facebook. She thinks the food business is begging for innovation, so she put together Local Food Lab at Columbia’s Eugene Lang Entrepreneurship Center and launched last fall with cofounders Mateo Aguilar and Laura O’Donohue.Is Food A Better Startup Market Than Tech?“The market doesn’t work for all but a very few very large companies,” she says. “And the market size for food is a trillion dollars. So it’s a huge opportunity for lots of cool ideas to make the system more efficient by applying the playbook developed by tech startups.”Thanks to a new “cottage food” law in the state, it’s now possible for California food entrepreneurs to start up in their garages, just like Steve Jobs (who, incidentally, would go for weeks eating only one thing, like carrots – after which, according to biographer Walter Isaacson, he would assume “a sunset-like orange hue”). The new California law makes it legal to sell up to $50,000 worth of food you made in your home kitchen.“So you can literally have a food garage startup and test $50,000 worth of product before you have to rent an expensive shared-use kitchen or find a factory,” Zajonc says. “It makes food startups radically affordable for the first time.”Cook Up Lunch? Or An iPhone App?And a lot easier than, say, enterprise software. Zajonc reminds Local Food Lab startups that they can get from concept to product in very lean fashion. Say you’ve got an idea for a great new energy snack. You can cook up a recipe (beta development), hand it out to people at the Sunday farmers market (user testing) and watch their facial expression as they chew (data collection).“Tech startups have disrupted so many different industries,” Zajonc says. “The food industry is ripe for disruption too.”And there’s another key benefit. “It’s true you can’t recreate the Silicon Valley ecosystem in other places but you can absolutely create a local food economy any place.”Image courtesy of Jeff Whyte / Shutterstock.center_img Related Posts Tags:#accelerators#incubators#startups tim devaney and tom steinlast_img read more

Elite rookie Jose vows to work hard after signing 3-year max deal

first_img“I know I will face veteran players who are bigger and more experienced that me, so I have to prepare myself for that,” he said.“It’s a big help that I was exposed to professional players too in the international games, but all I’ll do is focus on what coach will run for us.” Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Read Next PBA takes All-Star festivities to provinces anew Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37PNP vows dismissal for cadets in alleged hazing at PNPA01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES MOST READcenter_img “I was really thinking about it these past few days. I prayed that I will get the deal I deserve and I promised that I will really work hard for this.”Luckily for Jose, he has familiar faces in Far Eastern U alums Denok Miranda and Mac Belo in the Elite camp which made his adjustment period much easier.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“The transition was really easy because I have them here. I’ve already learned a lot in the two weeks I spent here and I’m not scared to ask them things. They really help me a lot,” said Jose, who was the third overall pick in last month’s rookie draft.But the 25-year-old isn’t just satisfied with cracking the Blackwater roster. This early, he’s readying himself in facing bigger and tougher frontcourt players once he makes his PBA debut. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FILE PHOTO – Raymar Jose was picked third by Blackwater in the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netRaymar Jose inked a maximum P8.5 million deal with Blackwater on Monday.“I’m happy that everything went okay,” Jose said in Filipino, finally making a decision of signing the three-year pact after initially being offered a one-year, P1.8 million contract.ADVERTISEMENT CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 View commentslast_img read more

#KicksStalker: Throwback to Jordan’s baseball days with J9 ‘Baseball Glove’

first_imgScreengrab from air.jordan.comIn his historic career, Michael Jordan never wore the ninth shoe in his signature line in an NBA game. In fact, the Jordan 9s more associated with His Airness’ time on the baseball diamond than on the court.Jordan Brand is honoring the GOAT’s baseball career with a specialized Jordan 9 resembling baseball mitts.ADVERTISEMENT Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games The brown colorway is made of the same material as the black ones but the number stitched on the heel will be the no. 35, Jordan’s jersey number when he played for the Scottsdale Scorpions in the Arizona Fall League.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Dubbed “Baseball Glove,” the shoe is made up of black premium leather in the upper with the texture of baseball gloves complete with stitching.The no. 45 also appears on the heel, a tribute to the jersey number Jordan wore when he played with the Birmingham Barons, the Chicago White Sox’ Double-A affiliate.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsAside from the black pairs, there will also be as a more limited brown version hitting the market.And as per SneakerNews.com, each pair of “Baseball Gloves” will be wrapped so customers won’t know what colorway they bought before they actually pop the shoes off the package. Nikki Valdez rushes self to ER due to respiratory tract infection View comments NCAA Season 93 Preview: San Beda aims to go back-to-back Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ MOST READ China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera LATEST STORIESlast_img read more