Wales v New Zealand: Five things we learned

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NOT FOR FEATURED That’s why Wales’ 13-man lineout, which led to their first points of the game as Scott Williams touched down, was such a thing of beauty. It looked like the sort of move you would expect to find in a book about Roman military history, not a coaching manual. Rugby needs more 13-man lineouts. It was sensational.Follow Paul Williams on Twitter @thepaulwilliams Down time: Alex Cuthbert dives over in the corner for Wales’ second try after the team had created an overlapBy Paul Williams“Positives from the game”Wales will undoubtedly “take some positives from the game” against the All Blacks. But therein lies the problem. Wales have once again become one of those teams that takes positives from defeats against the world’s best. This time last year that wasn’t the case. Wales were a team who took nothing from defeat except the regret that another southern hemisphere scalp had gone begging.Having said that, there were some positives to take. The Welsh scrum was stable and Scott Andrews’s performance was pleasingly assured. Jon Davies’s return to the squad added much-needed angle changes to the Welsh back-line and his ability to kick to the corners from the wider channels was a valuable tool. The Welsh lineout ran at 94.1% and during the last 15 minutes Wales amassed some impressive multi-phase sets, which resulted in the creation and the execution of a hard-earned overlap.Liam Williams’s spot tackling was impressive and it was good to see Sam Warburton being afforded the opportunity to carry the ball instead of being perpetually deployed on the ground – Warburton was the Welsh pack’s second-highest ball-carrier behind Toby Faletau. There were certainly positive elements within the Welsh performance, but to draw on them in the wake of a 33-10 defeat is unavoidably negative.Bitter blow: Bradley Davies receives treatmentNo place for cheap shotsAndrew Hore’s forearm hit on Wales second-row Bradley Davies was shameful and not befitting of the finest rugby nation in the world.  There are some people in New Zealand who think that having a sponsor’s name on the All Blacks jersey devalues the shirt. It doesn’t – punching a fellow professional on the side of the head, from behind, certainly does.It was the sort of cheap shot you would expect to see in Cardiff city centre at 5.20am, not pm. Last week, All Black fans rallied around Adam Thomson after the IRB decided to increase his ban from one to two weeks.  I don’t think Hore can count on the same support. At least I hope not.Tacklers missing in action Wales had a tackle completion of 80% against the All Blacks – their lowest percentage since 4 February 2011. It may be even longer than that. Wales haven’t tackled that badly for such a long time that I couldn’t actually find tackle completion data for Wales before that date.The Welsh back-line was particularly and uncharacteristically porous against the All Blacks, with the starting backs missing ten tackles between them – against Samoa, the whole squad of 23 only missed 12 in total. Much has been made of Gatland’s absence from the Welsh camp in recent weeks, yet on this defensive performance you could have been forgiven for thinking that it was Shaun Edwards who has been on a Lions sabbatical.Paying the penaltyWales’ decision to turn down kicks at goal in the first half and instead opt for touch was unusual. At best it panged of over-exuberance, at worst it smacked of desperation. The decision not to kick for goal in the third minute was particularly baffling – the game was in its infancy and there were zero points on the board.Driving reign: Scott Williams scores off that lineoutUnfortunately the mistakes didn’t end there for Wales. These rushes of blood to the head clearly left Rhys Priestland’s right foot a little under-nourished and the second decision to turn down a kickable penalty resulted in the line kick missing touch completely. Test rugby doesn’t afford you many opportunities to get into the red zone, when you’re there you must score.Bring back inventive playsRugby used to be littered with peculiar idiosyncratic moves. The ‘flying wedge’ and intricate tap-and-run penalty moves used to be a key part of the game. Sadly, they are no more. Standardised training ground drills, repetitive game plays and of course safety issues can leave rugby a bit on the bland side.last_img read more

International and club options in front of Jake White

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “He [White] is a very successful coach with an amazing track record. We would welcome an opportunity to engage with him, should it so arise.”With the Stormers apparently sniffing around as well a lot will come down to which mindset White really has: does he want to spend more time with the kids in South Africa, or is it international ambition that has forced him to walk? In stepping away from his role with the Brumbies it will be suggested that White is in the hunt for another international job – it is a running joke that White will interview for any major post going, but it is being suggested that Argentina and White are a match made in heaven as we chunter towards the 2015 World Cup.Undoubtedly, White wants to coach at international level again at some point. However, reports were circulating in South Africa as soon as the news broke that there was a nice easy fit for White at the Sharks franchise and only today CEO in Durban John Smit, who captained the Boks during that victorious World Cup under White, said: “Here at the Sharks we have a definite plan for our team. Could Jake White add value? Of course he can. CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA – 29 OCTOBER: South Africa’s John Smit and head coach Jake White hold up the WIlliam Webb Ellis Trophy during a ticker tape parade on 29 October, 2007 in Cape Town, South Africa. (Photo by Gallo Images/Getty Images) Jake makes a break: Jake White has walked out on the Brumbies despite having two years left of his contractBy Alan DymockShock caught most of the Brumbies fans when Jake White finally pulled out of the Super Rugby franchise. He had two years left on his current contract and had recently overseen contract extensions for players who wanted to continue working with the successful South African, but something drove him out of town.Despite rejuvenating the franchise, pushing them to a Super Rugby grand final and a victory over the British and Irish Lions in the last season, the coach has found his position untenable. As ever, word of mouth sends rumours fluttering out about why he would take such a decision. Chiefly amongst them are the social issues: he wants to spend more time with his sons back in South Africa, and the professional issues: he has been misled over a step up to coach the Wallabies and possibly disrespected by ARU officials.Dream Team: Smit and White celebrate winning the ’07 RWCThe World Cup winning coach certainly has plenty of weight in the international arena, having previously been linked to England, Australia and a return to the Springboks since he left that role in 2007 when he led the team to World Cup triumph.last_img read more

England usher in the next generation for the Six Nations

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Backs: Chris Ashton, Mike Brown, Danny Care, Elliot Daly, Ollie Devoto (injury replacement for Manu Tuilagi), Owen Farrell, George Ford, Alex Goode, Sam Hill (injury replacement for Henry Slade), Jonathan Joseph, Jack Nowell, Anthony Watson, Marland Yarde, Ben YoungsSee also the Six Nations Fixtures list Eddie Jones held court at a packed Twickenham as he announced the 33-man squad he hoped with redeem an England side that had disappointed so many in the World Cup Summing up, he said he wanted players who showed a strong desire to win for England. With that he was off with smiles all around.The Eddie Jones show is up and running…England 33-man EPS squad:Forwards: Josh Beaumont, Dan Cole, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Jack Clifford, Jamie George, Dylan Hartley, James Haskell, Paul Hill, Maro Itoje, George Kruis, Matt Kvesic (injury replacement for Dave Ewers), Joe Launchbury, Courtney Lawes, Joe Marler, Matt Mullan, Chris Robshaw, Henry Thomas (injury replacement for Kieran Brookes, Billy Vunipola, Mako Vunipolacenter_img Fast-Eddie: New England coach Eddie Jones holds court at Twickenham Eddie Jones named seven uncapped players at a packed press conference at Twickenham, as he unveiled the new 33-man England squad to compete in the Six Nations. With no sign of nerves, Jones joked freely with the assembled press pack, even quipping that he’d prefer to keep God Save The Queen as the anthem because he’d just learnt the words. He downplayed expectations in the Six Nations stressing that since 2003, England are ranked fourth, something he said was not reflective of the talent that existed in England.His watchwords were enthusiasm, energy and hard-work and he stressed that he’d be looking for a brand of rugby that suited England’s characteristics; namely a strong set-piece and dominant scrum but also saw the need to move the ball into the wider channels and exploit space.Surplus to requirements: Tom Youngs was a surprise omission from the squadOn the omissions – with Lancaster mainstays Tom Wood, Brad Barritt and particularly Tom Youngs the biggest casualties – he wouldn’t be drawn on specifics, only that they he’d spoken to all the players concerned and they knew what was required to get back in. Joe Simpson and Danny Cipriani can also consider themselves unlucky to have missed the cut. On the flip side, he made it clear Manu Tuilagi would be part of his plans, saying that after speaking to ‘Cockers’ (Richard Cockerill), he expected him to come into contention against Wales in the fourth round of the competition, or even sooner. Jones was steadfast in his refusal to get into the captaincy debate. Only offering that the captain had to be the one of the first players selected in the team, lead by example and set standards on and off the field.Game-changer: England will wait for Manu Tuilagi to be readyHe name checked several players during a lively press conference including Saracens trio Maro Itoje, Chris Ashton and Owen Farrell. Of Farrell he said was capable of playing 10 or 12. He also mentioned the injured Henry Slade saying he viewed him as a 10 or 12 but would look forward to closer inspecting the Exeter Chiefs playmaker when he had recovered from injury. The Harlequins backrow duo of Jack Clifford and Chris Robshaw were lauded with Robshaw particularly praised for his form at six, however he stressed that there would be. ‘no six and a halves’ operating in his starting lineup.With seven training sessions to get them primed for the warm welcome up in Murrayfield, he dampened expectations of a radical change in play. “It’s all about winning. I don’t play lovely rugby and come third,” he smiled.Next generation: Saracens lock Maro Itoje has long been earmarked for England recognitionFurther discussing selection, he felt it particularly important to get the front row right, with the only dampener the injury to the in-form tighthead Kieran Brookes, picking three players in each position, something he felt had left England light in a few other positions, with hooker, scrum-half and outside-half springing to mind.last_img read more

England’s World Cup-winning captain Martin Johnson

first_img TAGS: Leicester Tigers Martin Johnson led England to World Cup glory in 2003. Here the rugby icon talks bike-riding, old-style boots and BBC punditry LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sporting hero: Belgian cyclist Eddy Merckx in action (Getty Images)What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?It was from my PE teacher at Welland Park High School in Market Harborough. When you’re big at that age, you’re scoring all the tries and it’s easy. He said, “When you go up a level or others catch you up, you won’t be able to rely on that. You need to use all your skills.”It’s great advice, you’ve got to be an all-round player. I’ve never forgotten it.What’s your guilty pleasure?Biscuits. I’ll hoover anything really. I do ginger nuts at first dibble, with shortbread bottom of the list.What was your first job?Working in a nuts and bolts factory as a schoolboy in the summer holidays. I had a massive machine that I used to put nuts and bolts in. It was during the shutdown, so there was just a skeleton staff covering. I had this machine all to myself and I didn’t break it either.What would you choose as your specialist subject on Mastermind?I once did a Celebrity Mastermind for Wooden Spoon and chose the Waterloo campaign, 1815. Just on stage, not on TV – I’m not putting myself under that pressure! So I’d do Waterloo or the San Francisco 49ers in the 1980s. That was my era, when I was a kid watching them.Blast from past: Joe Montana of the San Francisco 49ers in action in 1985 (Getty Images)Any superstitions when you played?No, I just had a routine. But if I had the choice of a number I’d always choose a prime number. It’s a peculiarity of mine.How are you finding BBC TV punditry?It’s fun. Going to games not involving England is different for me. There’s a big audience, a lot of people who won’t watch a huge amount of rugby, so you have to get the balance right between those people and the rugby heads who want more detail.Is that the biggest challenge?The art is saying something concise and insightful without being too technical or trying to be too clever. Live TV outside is a challenge – you could barely hear yourself talk in Paris. The warm drinks come out when we’re off air and so far I’ve not spilt a coffee over the desk or been caught with a sandwich in my trap.How would you like to be remembered?Just as a decent bloke. “He wasn’t a knobhead.” That will do for me. Downtime with… England’s World Cup-winning captain Martin Johnson What’s the funniest thing you saw on the pitch?Back in the amateur days, Leicester were playing a cup semi-final at London Irish. Over the Tannoy came one of those announcements, “Would the owner of the Volvo, registration blah blah, please move it, you’re blocking the ambulance.” At which point their tighthead, Gary Halpin, went “That’s my car!” and left us there for three minutes while he went to sort it out.What really annoys you?People faffing about and wasting my time. I don’t like inefficiency.If your house was on fire, what one item would you save?My bike. I do enjoy riding when I can.Have you any cycle events coming up?Yeah, I do four or five a year. RideLondon, Birmingham’s back this year, I normally do one in the Peak District, I like to get to Europe every year. It’s nice to ride somewhere different, and challenging. Some of them are quite mountainous.Legendary leader: Martin Johnson lifts the World Cup in 2003 (Getty Images)What’s the silliest thing you’ve bought?I never buy anything that I regard as silly. Although people might regard spending money on a bike as silly.Okay, the best thing you’ve bought?My first Adidas rugby boots were one of my favourite things ever. Aged 12. They were a proper pair of boots because there was a difference then. If you had a high-cut pair of Adidas boots, in my eyes you were ‘the man’.What’s the best present you’ve ever received?My brother, Andrew, bought me a record player so I could play the old vinyl; that was a very thoughtful present.Do you have any phobias?Not really. Unless you count being stuck in traffic jams.Who would be your three dream dinner party guests?Only three? I’m setting the table for five. Napoleon and Wellington. That would be interesting. They only fought each other once and a lot of people say it was a score draw – it certainly wasn’t. I’d have Julius Caesar in there as well. Leonardo da Vinci. And Eddy Merckx, one of my sporting heroes. On your bike! Martin Johnson, here at a RideLondon event, is now a keen cyclist (Getty Images) This article originally appeared in the April 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop on the enthronement

first_img Comments (2) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Archbishop of Canterbury, Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, C David Williams+ says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Justin Welby Enthronement, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Video Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 22, 2013 at 12:55 pm It was good that ++Catherin attended. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Video: Presiding Bishop on the enthronement The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 21, 2013 at 11:36 pm It was a delight to see the PB at this function. In that great Anglican bastion, she brings a touch of reality and modernity to a peoples still struggling to find their way through the maze of doctrinal questions that the Episcopal Church in America might well help them find the answers to!I’m proud of her work in South America and in the Latin countries…she is constantly working to find common ground between those countries and to provide solid evidence of our evangelistic aims there.It was good to hear an emphasis on that at the Inauguration of Pope Francis 1st. If he looks to his side and not over his shoulder, he will find the PB there…a truly willing and successful partner in the effort! Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 21, 2013 Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori reflects on the enthronement of the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Fr Enoch Opuka says: last_img read more

Video: Deacon Clelia Garrity on her medical mission work in…

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Haiti, Haiti Medical Missions, Tags Video: Deacon Clelia Garrity on her medical mission work in Haiti Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Clelia P. Garrity of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, Florida, explains her call to do medical mission work in Haiti and her desire to help coordinate medical missions in the country. Garrity spoke during a break in the Sept. 6-7 Haiti Medical Missions Best Practices Symposium. The gathering was sponsored by Grey Dove Inc., which Garrity founded and whose goal is to stimulate the wellbeing and sustainability of communities throughout the world by providing primary and specialized medical care and prevention education.An ENS report on the symposium is here.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 13, 2013 Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Health & Healthcare, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Video Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Christians prepare for global ecumenical gathering in South Korea

first_img Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Rev. Fred Fenton says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC WCC Assembly 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (3) October 26, 2013 at 7:27 pm i do not believe that the Roman Catholics are members of the WCC by their own choosing. Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal News Service] The largest, most diverse gathering of Christians in the world will meet in the Republic of Korea from Oct. 30-Nov. 8 to deepen their fellowship, expand their knowledge of the ecumenical movement and address issues of peace and justice.About 125 Anglicans will join some 3,000 other Christians at the World Council of Churches 10th General Assembly in Busan.The Episcopal Church will be represented by Bishop Dean Wolfe of the Episcopal Diocese of Kansas; the Rev. Consuela Sanchez, provincial coordinator for the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras; and Jasmine Bostock, from the Episcopal Diocese of Hawaii, chair of the Executive Council Committee on Indigenous Ministry.The WCC Central Committee, based on recommendations from each member church, selects all delegates and volunteers to the assembly.“It’s easy for all Christians to believe that their expression of the Christian faith is the only expression,” Wolfe, who is leading the Episcopal Church’s official delegation at the septennial gathering, told ENS during a recent telephone interview. But, he added, ecumenical partnerships and encounters such as the WCC General Assembly “broaden our perspective. If Christ is Lord for all of us, how can we more fully live into that relationship?”Wolfe also acknowledged that the opportunity to be with Anglicans from around the world “is always a great gift to us. This has been a strained period of time, and for us to build relationships and to work to understand our brothers and sisters in the Anglican Communion is a significant endeavor. Additionally, this is an opportunity to join with 345 member churches from around the world – people representing Christianity in every part of the world. That can help to change the way we look at our mission in the world.”Sanchez said that she hopes the assembly will enable all churches to strengthen ties and “allow us to live in unity without any discrimination, since we all worship and serve the same God.”She also hopes the assembly will encourage “a more prophetic church [to] fight for justice and peace in the world [and to] provide opportunities to women, because living in the 21st century there is still gender discrimination.”Other participants from the Episcopal Church are the Rev. Margaret Rose, ecumenical and interreligious officer; Sarah Eagle Heart, missioner for indigenous ministries; Emma Lee Schauf, Rachel Cosca and Carrie Diaz Littauer, as young adult volunteers in the stewards program; and Carlin Van Schaik, a Young Adult Service Corps volunteer working with the Towards Peace in Korea program based in Seoul.The World Student Christian Federation will be represented by its director Christine Housel, and several ecumenical partners.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori described the assembly as “an opportunity to stand with others for the purpose of building a society of peace with justice.”She told ENS that the Episcopal Church’s participation “is our act of solidarity, our joining with other members of the body of Christ to realize this dream of God. We pray with our presence as well as our actions, strategizing, thinking theologically, and building coalitions. I give thanks for the willingness of our representatives to join this assembly in Busan, Korea.”The theme of the gathering, “God of life, lead us to justice and peace,” is intended to provide a focus for theological reflection, worship and meditation, as well as for planning programmatic activities before, during and after the assembly.“In a world that is divided by race, economics, politics, it is increasingly important for Christians to gather together and build bridges across the divides,” Wolfe told ENS. “We always have the opportunity as Christians to bring the light of Christ to a darkened world, and the question is will we?”The Episcopal Church’s full communion partners also will have a strong presence at the assembly, including representatives of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Moravian Church, Old Catholic Churches of the Union of Utrecht, Philippine Independent Church, and Mar Thoma Syrian Church of Malabar, India.Old Catholic Archbishop Joris Vercammen, leader of the Episcopal Church’s longest-standing full communion partner, said the World Council of Churches is central to leading the way in the ecumenical movement. “Ecumenism is a process, it’s a journey, so every assembly adds something to that journey,” he told ENS in a recent interview. “What’s important now is a statement on common vision…so we are on the way to getting an agreement on the theological thinking of the church, of ecclesiology. If we succeed, this document can be one on which a broad diversity of Christians can agree. That’s a major step forward in this ecumenical journey.”Since the World Council of Churches was established in 1948, this will mark the first time the General Assembly has met in Asia. The Republic of Korea was chosen because the church in recent decades has grown rapidly in Korea, where nearly 25 percent of the population is Christian.The inter-religious context of Korea highlights the growing experience of living dialogue that other churches around the world face. Korea also remains a politically divided peninsula with many people hoping that one day the north and south will be reunited. “The churches in Korea, together with the ecumenical movement, have been encouraging reunification efforts for decades,” according to the assembly program. “The hope for reconciliation and the assembly witness for reunification will significantly mark the 10th Assembly of the World Council of Churches.”Throughout the assembly, in addition to worship and workshops, ecumenical conversations will focus on some 20 themes, and on Sunday, Nov. 3, delegates will fan out across the Republic of Korea to attend worship services with hundreds of faith communities.Meanwhile, a Peace Train has begun its journey from Berlin, Germany, through Russia and China to northeast Asia and will arrive in Busan for the start of the assembly. The train, a project of the National Council of Churches in Korea (NCCK) and the Korean Host Committee for the WCC assembly, aims to raise awareness about the 60-year division of the Korean Peninsula.In another assembly initiative, WCC participants will be encouraged to wear black on Thursday, Oct. 31, in an effort towards reviving “Thursdays in Black,” a campaign against sexual and gender-based violence. “Through this simple gesture, participants are invited to be part of a global movement urging an end to violence against women,” a WCC release noted.Thursdays in Black was started by the WCC in the 1980s as a form of peaceful protest against rape and violence, especially taking place during wars and conflicts.Reflecting on the assembly theme, Wolfe asked: “How can the Christian community be a witness for peace and justice in the world?” A piece of the answer, he said, “is in coming to know ourselves, in crossing the boundaries of denominations and nations and finding the essential piece of the Christian faith that binds us together, that helps us to move to address the great issues of the world. A broken church cannot heal the world.”“Transformation of our societies toward the earthly vision of the Reign of God is fundamental Christian work,” Jefferts Schori told ENS. “This is the center of the prayer Jesus taught: your kingdom come, on earth as it is in heaven. Our partners in the Anglican Church of Korea are among the local hosts, and their own witness for peace and reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula gives an example of what this work of building the Reign of God looks like. The Episcopal Church is a partner in that work, and our presence at this assembly will help us discover and support other opportunities for building a world of peace and justice. Pray for our delegation, and for the work of the assembly.”Vercammen agreed. “If the gospel can’t express itself in justice and peace, it’s losing its soul,” he said.What is the WCC Assembly?The assembly is the highest governing body of the World Council of Churches (WCC), and meets every seven years. It is a moment when the fellowship of member churches comes together as a whole in prayer and celebration.The assembly has the mandate to review programs, to issue public statements and determine the overall policies of the WCC, as well as to elect presidents and a Central Committee that oversees the council’s work until the next assembly.Along with the WCC member churches, partner organizations and other churches have a strong presence at the event. This makes an assembly of the WCC the most diverse Christian gathering of its size in the world. It is a unique opportunity for the churches to deepen their commitment to visible unity and common witness so that world may believe.Sharing from the diverse spiritual experiences of churches around the world is a powerful expression of unity shared in Christ. The spiritual life of each assembly – worship, Bible study and prayer – is a particular highlight.The WCC was established at its 1st Assembly in Amsterdam, Netherlands (1948). Since then assemblies have been in held in Evanston, United States (1954); New Delhi, India (1961); Uppsala, Sweden (1968); Nairobi, Kenya (1975); Vancouver, Canada (1983); Canberra, Australia (1991); Harare, Zimbabwe (1998); and Porto Alegre, Brazil (2006).— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service.  Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET October 21, 2013 at 9:32 pm This is the first that I have heard of the WCC Assembly. The report says little about ecumenism as such. I certainly agree with Fr. Fenton above.Harry The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments are closed.center_img Christians prepare for global ecumenical gathering in South Korea WCC General Assembly to lift up peace and justice issues October 21, 2013 at 8:03 pm I am concerned this report about the upcoming WCC General Assembly says nothing about Pope Francis. His words and deeds have electrified Christendom. Every church leader I know is talking about the radical, new approach he is taking to the exercise of his office. He appears to be the pope we have waited for since the beginning of the modern ecumenical movement. Only a pope can restore the unity of the whole Church. Pope Francis could be the man. Business as usual at this General Assembly would mean that we have not eyes to see or ears to hear what God is saying to the churches though this humble, brave, prophetic leader. Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK john neir says: Anglican Communion, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET By Matthew DaviesPosted Oct 21, 2013 Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Harry w Shipps says: last_img read more

Episcopal, ELCA Presiding Bishops issue statement on carbon emissions

first_img Comments (13) June 6, 2014 at 2:09 pm According to the EPA’s own estimates, even if every coal-fired power station in the USA was shut down by 2030, it would only reduce global temperatures by a completely meaningless 0.05 degrees F by 2100. This is merely a waste of time and money. Given the regressive effects of the substantial energy cost increases (or energy unavailability) necessitated by the rule, I don’t see how the EPA’s rules will help anybody live a more fulfilling life but will instead worsen poverty and economic regression. June 26, 2014 at 5:11 pm The Episcopal Church holds a General Convention every 3 years during which hundreds of representatives of every part of the church, both lay and clergy, debate and decide on issues. At the most recent convention (2012) the members passed resolution which “calls on congregations, institutions, dioceses . . . . to work for the just transformation of the world’s energy beyond and away from fossil fuels (including all forms of oil, coal, and natural gas) and toward safe, sustainable, renewable, community controlled energy, and that fossil fuel workers and their families be supported during the transition to a “post-carbon” society; and be it furtherResolved, That the 77th General Convention calls on congregations, institutions, dioceses . . . . of The Episcopal Church to resist the development and expansion of ever more unconven- tional, dangerous, and environmentally destructive sources of fossil fuel and move toward conversion to more sustainable sources.The Presiding Bishop does not speak to issues unless the General Convention has taken a stand, which, in this case, it has. Again, I would point out that the Presiding Bishop did not just “make it up”. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET June 12, 2014 at 10:36 am Religious leaders and celebrated scientists can both be wrong and misleading. Ms. Speer, please note Mr. Foster’s comments. I also do not agree with the Episcopal PB’s statement, nor was I asked my opinion. In that sense, she “made it up.” The entire statement smacks more of propaganda than sound policy. I’m not even sure it is sound theology. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Environment & Climate Change, Michael J. Wise says: June 6, 2014 at 5:05 pm The naysayers will be plentiful, but few will seem concerned about people that will live several thousand years from now. They seem to think only in terms of a century or two at the most. – Douglas M. Carpenter, Birmingham, AL Submit a Press Release Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Alice Speers says: June 9, 2014 at 11:32 am ““Lutherans and Episcopalians collectively celebrate and support the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon rule for existing power plants.”She and the Lutheran Bishop made this up. They couldn’t possibly have taken a real pole of their respective memberships in the time lapsed, and my spies in the Episcopal Church tell me no such poll was take. So either the Presiding Bishop made it up, or else “collectively” here means ‘The Presiding Bishop’. Paul Connors says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 June 6, 2014 at 5:09 pm “Lutherans and Episcopalians collectively celebrate and support the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon rule for existing power plants.”How do the Bishops know? Have their respective denominations taken a vote on the proposed rule? No, of course not. It just came out. They made it up, like they often do. And they’re once again making pronouncements on things they know very little about. Steve Hiscoe says: Episcopal, ELCA Presiding Bishops issue statement on carbon emissions Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ecumenical & Interreligious, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Joseph F Foster says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls June 8, 2014 at 11:47 am Today is Pentecost, and I give thanks for the power of the Holy Spirit to lead us into all truth and to inspire our efforts to protect life as it has evolved on this planet. I am grateful to the leadership of TEC and ELCA for issuing this strong statement on climate change. Climate change accelerates and complicates all the other issues that we care about, from sustainable water supplies and food production to economic justice, public health, immigration, and national security. The EPA’s new rules on coal-fired power plants are the best step yet taken by the federal government to tackle climate change, though what we really need is a price on carbon that does not burden the poor, and strong, binding international treaties. Let’s build the climate movement and make it politically possibly to do what is scientifically necessary. Rector Belleville, IL June 13, 2014 at 11:43 am Could not agree with you more, Margaret Bullitt-Jonas! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing June 7, 2014 at 10:04 am Since the U.S. is responsible for about one eighth of the world’s carbon emissions, I wonder what the P.B.s have to say about the poor Chinese and Indian folk who are literally choking on the emissions from their own power plants. Should they not be saying/doing more to encourage global cooperation in the efforts to curb them. I worry that this kind of simplistic knee-jerk reaction is why the churches in the U.S. seem to be losing those who take a more nuanced view of global issues. Asking their parishioners to accept political decisions without, at least, acknowledging the broader more complex global and national trade-offs is a bit much! Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Jeffrey Parker says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 26, 2014 at 6:14 pm Once again, two of the most left wing mainstream denominations weigh in on a subject, namely the EPA’s ruling on carbon emissions with complete and utter disregard for the fact that the regulations are deleterious to the economic well being of the poor and struggling middle classes. Since the science of climate change has not been definitively proven by either the pros or cons and the US Supreme Court saw fit (based on zero scientific expertise) to issue an edict that CO2 is a pollutant (when anyone who knows better remembers their grammar school science lessons that CO2 is needed by all plant life to synthesize Oxygen), the ECUSA and ELCA, chock full of world renowned climatologists (NOT!) just had to weigh in.Ladies and gentlemen, to include those of you who believe Obama’s lies about the need to again over-regulate US industries as well as harm people with ever rising utilities costs, it should NOT be the business of these two churches to weigh in on these things.We all hear enough of this political demagoguery to fill a football stadium. Why do I need to hear this from Episcopal House? In what way are the priests and bishops of this church qualified to comment or for that matter do anything about climate change? Here’s a simple and less than tactful answer: they are NOT!If the Presiding Bishop ever wants to have a prayer of stopping the loss of members, perhaps the national church should cease and desist from making absurd and ridiculous proclamations in lockstep with the fools in other dysfunctional and dystopian churches. Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Douglas M. Carpenter says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Prof. John Switzer says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ June 7, 2014 at 12:12 pm Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori is a trained scientist. I doubt very much she would just “make it up”. Comments are closed. Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Claire McGowan says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Jun 6, 2014 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth A. Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement in support of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Rule on carbon emissions.“The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Episcopal Church are eager to collaborate with the EPA and states across the nation to ensure that the carbon rule is implemented fairly, particularly for low-income consumers,” the Presiding Bishops stated. “We will continue to pray that all involved in this good work will be graced with vision, hope, and the search for truth as they seek to implement the carbon rule swiftly and effectively.”The joint statement follows:Joint Statement on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Rule on carbon emissionsLutherans and Episcopalians collectively celebrate and support the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon rule for existing power plants. As faith traditions committed to the health, flourishing, and sanctity of human communities and God’s creation, we believe that the carbon rule is a critical step toward safeguarding the lives and livelihood of future generations.Recent reports outline the enormous impacts that climate change is already having on our world.  Multi-year droughts, sea level rise, extreme weather events, and increased flooding dramatically affect communities internationally, from the Inupiat on the north slope of Alaska to Midwestern farming families to our brothers and sisters in the Philippines. We recognize with concern that climate change particularly harms low income communities that lack the resources and technology to adapt to rapid environmental changes.These impacts are already affecting global agriculture, and with it, food supplies and prices. Ending hunger and alleviating global poverty are key concerns for our faith traditions. Yet our work faces the daunting and interconnected challenges of addressing hunger and poverty in a rapidly changing climate.  Sustainable solutions must include both poverty alleviation and environmental conservation.Power plants are the single largest source of carbon dioxide pollution in the United States and major contributors to climate change. These emissions not only threaten the environmental stability of our planet, but also the health of young children and their families, disproportionally affecting the poorest among us.  Yet there are currently no limits on power plant emissions of greenhouse gases.The carbon rule proposed this week will reduce the carbon dioxide output from existing power plants, setting a strong standard that will modernize our nation’s power plants while limiting our contribution to global climate change. Reducing carbon emissions from power plants must be a top priority for the U.S. if we hope to prevent the worst impacts of climate change and ensure a just and sustainable world for our generation and those to come.Our faith traditions teach us that no single person can be whole unless all have the opportunity for full and abundant life. That wholeness and collective well-being is only possible as a global community. We recognize our connections to fellow citizens and neighbors around the world who are already suffering from the consequences of climate change, and acknowledge our responsibility to those yet unborn, who will either benefit from our efforts to curb carbon emissions or suffer from our failure to address this ethical imperative. We believe that addressing climate change is a moral obligation to our neighbors and to God’s creation, so that all may enjoy full, healthy, and abundant lives.The proposed carbon rule for existing power plants is the single largest step that we can take now to address the pressing issue of climate change. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Episcopal Church are eager to collaborate with the EPA and states across the nation to ensure that the carbon rule is implemented fairly, particularly for low-income consumers.  We will continue to pray that all involved in this good work will be graced with vision, hope, and the search for truth as they seek to implement the carbon rule swiftly and effectively.The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchThe Rev. Elizabeth A. EatonPresiding BishopEvangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Joseph F Foster says: June 24, 2014 at 9:36 pm The Episcopal Church doesn’t take “Polls” before our leaders can speak. The Presiding Bishop is authorized to speak on behalf of the Church. Good shepherds knows their sheep. Alice Speers says: June 6, 2014 at 4:35 pm The statement mentions the impact on “global agriculture” as well as “food supplies and prices.” Did the two presiding bishops and their staffs look into the fact that there are actually scientists who propose that rising global temperatures, if they come, will actually increase crop production on a planetary scale? In their concern for rising prices, have they any words concerning governmental mismanagement and the effects that economic mismanagement is having on prices and on the ability of the poor to survive? Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Advocacy Peace & Justice, Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bill Harrison says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Australia: Primate demands action after Nauru detention files leak

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Anthony Price says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Anglican Communion News Service] Leaked documents about Australia’s detention of asylum seekers on the island of Nauru are “shocking and saddening,” said Archbishop of Melbourne Philip Freier, primate of the Anglican Church of Australia. The documents, which were published by the Guardian newspaper, “paint a picture of successive Australian governments abandoning vital moral principles and treating refugees with callous cruelty to send a message of deterrence,” he said adding: “It is always wrong to use people as a means to another end.”Full article. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Australia: Primate demands action after Nauru detention files leak August 11, 2016 at 4:45 pm Sad and disgusting behavior by the Australian government. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Comments (1) Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By Gavin Drake Posted Aug 11, 2016 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Comments are closed. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

European churches call for day of prayer commemorating refugees who’ve…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Posted Jun 13, 2017 [Conference of European Churches] Since 2000, more than 30,000 migrants and refugees have lost their lives on their way to Europe, often drowning at sea or suffocating in containers on trucks and ships. Churches throughout Europe have responded through intensive solidarity and humanitarian efforts at Europe’s borders and by advocating for safe and legal passage.Full article. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH European churches call for day of prayer commemorating refugees who’ve died in transit Advocacy Peace & Justice, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Refugees Migration & Resettlement Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more